Melting Antarctic ice will make sea levels rise – by how much?
Climate Change Global Warming Antarctica

Melting Antarctic ice will make sea levels rise – by how much?

Prof Dr Ilan Kelman
Prof Dr Ilan Kelman

In 10 Seconds? Antarctic ice – melting due to climate change - contributes substantially to rising sea levels, worsening the effects of storms and flooding. But to what extent? New research shows we are unlikely to know it this century. However, we can minimize the impact.

What is at stake? If global temperatures climbed up by 2 percent from pre-industrial levels by the end of the century, rising sea levels could affect about 700 million people living in at-risk coastal areas. Thus, we need to know what kind of sea-level rise we need to prepare for to protect homes and livelihoods. Using a huge number of ice-sheet model simulations, researchers have created an ‘emulator’ and project how melting Antarctic ice could contribute to sea-level rise. Among the scenarios was a high-emissions scenario, assuming that greenhouse gas emissions would keep increasing by 2100 and a low-emissions one, presuming that humanity aggressively cut back the release of such gases in the next few decades.

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