Predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) via epigenetic profiles in the blood
Mental Health PTSD Depression

Predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) via epigenetic profiles in the blood

Katherine Bassil
Katherine Bassil

In 10 seconds? Researchers are one step closer to predicting vulnerability to PTSD in soldiers, which is good news for everyone as 1 in 5 people exposed to a traumatic event are likely to develop this stress disorder.

What’s the story? Neuroscientists have made a great discovery in understanding why not all individuals are vulnerable to developing PTSD. Comparing so-called epigenetic profiles in the blood could allow early prediction of the condition in people likely to be exposed to a traumatic event, particularly soldiers.

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