Predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) via epigenetic profiles in the blood
Mental Health PTSD Depression

Predicting post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) via epigenetic profiles in the blood

Katherine Bassil
Katherine Bassil

In 10 seconds? Researchers are one step closer to predicting vulnerability to PTSD in soldiers, which is good news for everyone as 1 in 5 people exposed to a traumatic event are likely to develop this stress disorder.

What’s the story? Neuroscientists have made a great discovery in understanding why not all individuals are vulnerable to developing PTSD. Comparing so-called epigenetic profiles in the blood could allow early prediction of the condition in people likely to be exposed to a traumatic event, particularly soldiers.

Get unlimited access to our 3-min Digests and other premium features

Choose your plan:

Personal

$99/year

✅ Includes 7-day free trial for new users
✅ Weekly Recap
✅ Daily newsletter
✅ Access 4 topic areas of your choosing
✅ Access all citations and resources
✅ Gain background knowledge with a Quick Dive
✅ The Sparrow Sessions Podcast
✅ No ads
❌ Direct access to the Expert Network
❌ Your questions - answered by an Expert Scientist
❌ 12 hours of consultations with our fabulous experts per year (that’s 1 hour per month!)
❌ Access to all topic areas as we scale the Content Library

We'll send you a reminder email 3 days before your trial ends.

Start my free trial

Professional

$3499/year

✅ Includes 7-day free trial for new users
✅ Weekly Recap
✅ Daily newsletter
✅ Access all citations and resources
✅ Gain background knowledge with a Quick Dive
✅ The Sparrow Sessions Podcast
✅ No ads
✅ Direct access to the Expert Network
✅ Your questions - answered by an Expert Scientist
✅ 12 hours of consultations with our fabulous experts per year (that’s 1 hour per month!)
✅ Access to all topic areas as we scale the Content Library

We'll send you a reminder email 3 days before your trial ends.

Start my free trial